Connecting with Students During Distance Learning

Literacy

Professional Development

April 2, 2020

Connecting with Students During Distance Learning

Share on facebook
Share on pinterest
Share on twitter
Share on email

In this post, I share 17 ideas for connecting with students during distance learning.

Have you found yourself drowning in all that is involved with distance learning? Maybe you have even found yourself just missing seeing your students each day. I have heard some people compare this time to summertime. But friends, it is very different than summer break. At this time, we all know that for sure. We all feel it. No proper goodbye to your students. No planned award ceremony. No end of year party. Just a feeling of being done and not knowing when you will be reunited again.

Before the summer break, you get to make sure you are enjoying every last second with your sweet students, who truly feel like family.

Not with distance learning that happens so suddenly. That is a whole different experience and one that may be new to you. Staying connected to students is incredibly important for both students and the teacher. Connecting with students during distance learning doesn’t have to be difficult or tricky. It can be simple!

Here are 17 ways to connect with students during distance learning.

1. Send an email telling them how you have seen them grow so far this year

2. Send a snail mail card to tell them you are thinking of them

3. Use the app Bomb Bomb to send a personalized video to each kid

4. Use Loom to send a video-teaching or non-teaching

5. Tell them what you have done today

6. Remind them of a funny time you all had together

7. Suggest a topic for a backyard science investigation

8. Challenge them to read five books this week and share their favorite one with you

9.Create a Private Facebook Group and do weekly check-ins

10.Set up a Zoom classroom meeting and allow each child to share something great

11.Record yourself reading a book using Loom

12.Invite them to a pajama party for a bedtime story via Zoom

13. Ask them to go for a shape hunt nature walk and send a picture of their favorite discovery

14. Leave a sidewalk message at their home in chalk

15. Send a picture of something that made you think of them and tell them why

16. Send a snail mail letter to one to two kids per week

17. Send a student weekly newsletter just for the students in your classroom.

CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD a Printable List of Ideas

While the setting is totally different, we can keep the classroom community alive through this time of distance learning. Connecting with students during distance learning will help them have some sense of normalcy when they hear and see the people they’re used to being around so often.

I’d encourage you to try a few things on this list to keep a strong connection with your students, even it’s outside of your comfort zone. Choose ways to connect that work with your schedule (and your supplies!).

Reach out and let me know if you have other great ways you are intentionally staying in contact with your students. I’d love to hear about it!

Happy Teaching,

Amanda

8 Get to Know You Games for Distance Learning

Getting to know your students can be trickier while distance learning. Grab this FREE printable with eight get-to-know-you games and activities so that you can start connecting with students, help them get to know each other, and build a positive classroom community.

Hi, I'm Amanda

I’m a K-1 teacher who is passionate about making lessons your students love and that are easy to implement for teachers.  Helping teachers like you navigate their way through their literacy block brings me great joy. I am a lifelong learner who loves staying on top of current literacy learning and practices. Here, you’ll find the tools you need to move your K-2 students forward!

Topics

Literacy
Math
Science
Writing
Digital
Soc St

JOIN THE FACEBOOK GROUP

Join the Balanced Literacy Facebook group!  Let’s discuss, learn together, grow, and be better at our craft of teaching!

You may also enjoy...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Which type of professional development interests you?